Last Updated 21/1/2011

 

TO IRISH TIMES

Dear Editor, Opinion Editor and News Editor,

For some years I have been attempting to get replica watches sale about abuse in the Bethany Home and similar institutions into mainstream Irish media. By and large I have failed. To take your newspaper, neither of my two books (2005, 2008) on my story of institutional abuse and neglect were given any coverage or review on publication. None of the important information I have hublot replica uk under Freedom on Information and given to the Irish Times was covered.

The article about me in The Guardian newspaper on June 18 was a breakthrough, as it led to Patsy McGarry's small mention in your newspaper on June 20. You then published my article on July 1, for which (as I stated afterwards) I am grateful.

However, since then, again, nothing.

I put out a call on July 3 to heads of Protestant rolex replica sale to support putting the Bethany Home on the redress scheme list. It was not covered.

I followed up last Friday with a letter to the same leaders with three requests (Copy below). It was not covered.

Senator David Norris sent me a copy of a short letter he sent to you about my article. It was not published.

Niall Meehan from Griffith College in Dublin sent me a copy of an rolex replica sale that follows up mine with new information supporting the contention that the Bethany Home was a children's home, that it was a sectarian institution, and that it was regulated by the Irish state. The article gives an insight into why there is resistance to covering my story. He also sent me a rejection slip from Peter Murtagh claiming that the article made similar points to mine. That is not true.

There are four rolex replica sale items which you have not published. Is there a threshold of importance relating to my story that does not seem to apply to victims of Roman Catholic abuse? Should I go back to the Guardian and get them to cover my situation again?

I am planning a public visit to the site of the Bethany Home with other abuse victims. There is not much point if you consider the story not important enough to be covered on an ongoing basis by the Irish Times.

Mary Raftery wrote in your newspaper 2004 that victims of abuse in Protestant institutions observed, "Had they been born Catholic, they argue, they would now be better treated". Maybe you could think about that.

Please advise.

Yours sincerely,
Derek Leinster

(I attach my correspondence with Archbishop Neill - there may be something newsworthy in it - his claim after stating that Bethany was run by a Trust that he knew nothing at all about it.)
“I express deep personal sympathy for all victims of abuse or mistreatment in institutions run by any organisation, regardless of denomination. It is right that any complaint made by such victims should be investigated.”
Error! Filename not specified.
Most Revd Dr John Neill, Archbishop of Dublin, July 10, 2009, email to Derek Leinster
Call to
Heads of Protestant Churches in Ireland
From
Derek Leinster
Former Bethany Home Resident

Archbishop of Dublin, John Gregg, termed Bethany a home for ‘fallen’ women, when he presided at the opening in 1922.
Please reverse the stigma of that insult. Protestant women were obliged by the dictates of religious and social prejudice to have their babies out of sight and out of mind, before being pressurised into giving them up. I am a lifelong victim of that prejudice and the Bethany Home was guilty of documented gross neglect.
Please agree to these simple and just demands:

  • I ask you to publicly support my demand that The Bethany Home, Rathgar (1922-72), be placed within the terms of the Irish Government’s redress and compensation scheme, by placing it in the official list of homes within the redress scheme.
  • I ask that you support my demand that the conduct and running of the Bethany Home be subject to a public investigation by a competent and independent person or body.
  • I ask you to direct that all church records and correspondence with regard to Bethany Home be released to me at your earliest convenience and that you assist me in identifying all sources of such possible correspondence or records.

July 10, 2009
Further information:
Derek Leinster, Wakefield England, former Bethany Home Resident




“I express deep personal sympathy for all victims of abuse or mistreatment in institutions run by any organisation, regardless of denomination. It is right that any complaint made by such victims should be investigated.”
Error! Filename not specified.
Most Revd Dr John Neill, Archbishop of Dublin, July 10, 2009, email to Derek Leinster
Call to
Heads of Protestant Churches in Ireland
From
Derek Leinster
Former Bethany Home Resident

Archbishop of Dublin, John Gregg, termed Bethany a home for ‘fallen’ women, when he presided at the opening in 1922.
Please reverse the stigma of that insult. Protestant women were obliged by the dictates of religious and social prejudice to have their babies out of sight and out of mind, before being pressurised into giving them up. I am a lifelong victim of that prejudice and the Bethany Home was guilty of documented gross neglect.
Please agree to these simple and just demands:

  • I ask you to publicly support my demand that The Bethany Home, Rathgar (1922-72), be placed within the terms of the Irish Government’s redress and compensation scheme, by placing it in the official list of homes within the redress scheme.
  • I ask that you support my demand that the conduct and running of the Bethany Home be subject to a public investigation by a competent and independent person or body.
  • I ask you to direct that all church records and correspondence with regard to Bethany Home be released to me at your earliest convenience and that you assist me in identifying all sources of such possible correspondence or records.

July 10, 2009

 

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